What Oil do You Use?

Sidequestadventure

Finally made it
Location
SF Bay Area
Tell us what oil you use, why you chose it and your experience with it. Also, if you can tell us how many miles you've been running it for.

Himalayan calls for a 4T MA2.

Should you use standard motor oil?

- No. Standard motor oil synthetic or no may contain friction modifiers that can cause your clutch to slip.

Can you use full synthetic?
- Yes, However since the bike is new read people's reports below.
(A couple of people have made remarks in high heat, high use corner cases their clutch slipped but moving back to a semi-syn or dino cured the issue, but take this with a grain of salt)

What is MA/MA2 standard:
- These are 4T motorcycle wet clutch specification for manufacturers to follow: See details here


"But, 100% synthetic is more slippery or lighter weight than pure dino farts"
- 100% false, 100% urban legend. First ; Slippery is not a technical term for oil, it's a term used at the comsumer level that incorrectly describes actual properties of how oil sticks to surfaces and how it behaves as a fluid, which also are not mutually exclusive. However at a consumer level I'm sure it's a perfectly good term
- All oil manufacturers weight specifications are defined by a standard just because it's synthetic does not change the standard
- Synthetic by nature "sticks" to metals easier all while reducing the chance of shearing. (BTW sticks, and bonds are not correct terms here, but it paints a picture)
- This means it inherently does not "leak" or "slip" through seals more easily than dino farts, again perpetrated by Loc Ness Monster and you should never believe him, he's an asshole
- In fact many synthetics (mostly car high mileage versions I think) actually have an additive that slightly swell the surface of a seal to help close the gap.
- I know somebody is bound to want to argue about this but unless you can actually cite an article that was made in the last decade that wasn't written by a marketing company or some old man that doesn't understand composites then you have no ground.


Lastly, bearing grind tests are NOT a relevant way of testing oil properties. They are not accurate and do not in anyway reflect proper oil capabilites. This is due to the fact that almost all modern oils rely on additive to improve the quality of the oil, when you run the bearing grind test you are effectively only looking at 1 small part of what the oil is capable of doing. Even then you are looking at how the oil reacts to exposes metals that are shearing, not the oil shearing itself. These are not the same thing and under normal operating conditions.


*Note: I'd love to update this top list with oils that are verified to work well, any additional technical information, etc.
 

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Sidequestadventure

Finally made it
Location
SF Bay Area
I'm using Castrol Activo 20w-50 which is a semi synthetic I've had from 300 miles to 1000 miles and will change next week, simply because I have a big ride coming up.

I'm considering switching to another semi from another brand or full synthetic. I have weeping around the chain tensioner which I won't be able to address until after the ride so will probably stick to an oil I can more commonly find.

This oil was recommended to be my some dude named Jesse that's part of the Flying Monkey's group. He also was one of the people who mentioned in his video that he had issues with full synthetic when the clutch was hot.
 

Kiwiscoot

Well travelled
I use full synthetic 10W60 Penrite oil
https://www.penriteoil.com.au/products/mc-4st-10w-60-100-pao-ester#/
I went over my whole bike and was quite surprised by how loose the bolts on the engine was. Tightened them all and after 10 000 kms/6000 miles I have had no weeps or anything. Clutch has had some pretty hard work in +30C/+86Ftemperatures riding gnarly 4wd tracks and never slipped.
My bike shop uses 10W50 full synthetic. Full synthetic oil makes the gear shift smoother.
 

Flicka

Well travelled
Location
Italy
From the specs it seems really a good oil, but I think that a 15w50 should be a better choice for the Himalayan. To have the same kinematic viscosity the 10w60 should reach the temperature of 110/120 degrees celsius. The oil duct of a motor are calibrated for the viscosity of the oil recommended by the manufacturer at 100°C, in this case "cSt 18"; the oil you are using, at the same temperature, has a viscosity of "cSt 25,6". If there is no precise reason to use that gradation, you are only wasting fuel and you have a (small) loss of power too.
 

Leyprest

Well travelled
I use Motul 5100 15w50 semi synthetic in my Himalayan. Because 15w50 is what Royal Enfield says to use in that engine. I don't see any reason not to use the specified grade of oil. After all it's specified for a reason and all engines seem to run better when given the proper value oil in my experience.
 

TN_twowheeladdict

Well travelled
Location
Tennessee
I use Motul 5100 15w50 semi synthetic in my Himalayan. Because 15w50 is what Royal Enfield says to use in that engine. I don't see any reason not to use the specified grade of oil. After all it's specified for a reason and all engines seem to run better when given the proper value oil in my experience.
I have a service bulletin from Royal Enfield that says 20w50 is fine as a substitution to 15w50.
 

MrDralas

Well travelled
Location
Planet Earth
I used 20w50 semi synthetic for 6k miles in 2 oil changes at 300 miles then at 3000 miles, cause it’s what I could get. Last oil change was 15w50 shell full synthetic at 6000 miles because the store didn’t have any of the 20w50 semi. Next oil change will get what I can find easy and cheap. I find for the most part if you don’t worry too much about it and keep it topped up and change it often things last a long time.
 

TN_twowheeladdict

Well travelled
Location
Tennessee
I used 20w50 semi synthetic for 6k miles in 2 oil changes at 300 miles then at 3000 miles, cause it’s what I could get. Last oil change was 15w50 shell full synthetic at 6000 miles because the store didn’t have any of the 20w50 semi. Next oil change will get what I can find easy and cheap. I find for the most part if you don’t worry too much about it and keep it topped up and change it often things last a long time.
Sure hope there won't be any topping up between changes on this bike. I've never had to top up between changes on any of my bikes. I sure do like having a sight glass.

I've had bikes that made you do a dance to check the oil level which resulted in many owners putting too much oil in.
 

MrDralas

Well travelled
Location
Planet Earth
Sure hope there won't be any topping up between changes on this bike. I've never had to top up between changes on any of my bikes. I sure do like having a sight glass.

I've had bikes that made you do a dance to check the oil level which resulted in many owners putting too much oil in.
Around town mine doesn’t use any oil, when it’s run close to redline for hours at a time it uses some oil. I think I’ve had to add .3 of a litre in the last 2000 miles or so. I check the oil every morning on the Center stand let it run for a min shut it off wait a min and then check it.
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
I use any oil that has the right specs (according to the users manual): 15W50, MA2, semi synth.
At the moment I have some Motul 5100 because it is the right spec, it is available and it is not outrageously expensive.
Locally sourced (the shop is in Holland) and fully recyclable (in a million years or so).
 

Scott Free

Finally made it
Location
Ill-Annoy
Dealer told me all that really matters is the JASO spec, and 20W50 is just fine. Now at 12,000 miles, on Valvoline 20W50 dino oil to 9000, since then on their full syn.
 
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