What have you done to your Himalayan today (or yesterday, or this week ...)

tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
Haha horns is srs biz according to Roy! You went off on another guy in another horn thread for the same thing. You're definitely not wrong tho :D

Just maybe a bit jumpy. I'll wager a proper pint that @Caspice will be fine lol
Hah, I remember that as well, there was photographic exhibits entered into evidence on behalf of the defense. I believe there was horn misidentification in that trail at the root of the matter, but all was civil and resolved amicably.
@Roy Gavin , this is all in fun just so you know. I don’t know your status, but I’m getting older and sometimes my mind matches on something a bit stronger than perhaps it could when it shouldn’t. My coworkers tease me, it’s funny but humbling. Just know no ill will here, I’m just glad to be alive to at times debate a relay need. ;)
 

Andy131

Well travelled
Location
Manchester UK
I just wonder if we are comparing apples with potatoes.
Cars in general send vast amounts of signals on bus systems, the switches rarely switch a load and just signal to the computer that you want the lights on. The computer using relays switches the lights on. Bikes on the other hand have a computer for the fuel injection / spark and everything else is hard wired, so the switches do control the lights.

If you over-specify the wiring and switches they will lose very little energy as resistance and will last a long time - but the accountants will crucify you.
If you have light gauge wiring and cheaper switches, but with relays and thicker wires carrying the heavy current you have a system that loses little as resistance costs less than the first option but is more complicated - then the accountants ruin it by insisting on cheap relays.
Then again if you leave the engineering to engineers and lock away the accountants we would end up with bikes that are bullet proof but cost £1,000,000
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
I do find the wiring of the Hima very thin, but so far it managed to keep the smoke in. Also I have as yet not heard of any (RE) bikes having gone up in smoke as the result of said wiring.
That being said, when I connected an auxillary light to move with the front fork I used a relay, just to be safe. I draws a nominal 22 W, almst 2 amps and I thought that a bit much for the existing wires. Better be safe than be sorry.
 

Bulldogfour

Getting there...
Location
Wiltshire UK
Fitted a set RE pannier frames. Ok they weren’t that far out in terms of fitment, just the odd squeeze here and there. On the other hand, getting the bolts into place is something else. As many recommend you have to run a bolt into any previously unused threads as they are full of paint. Very easy to cross thread and I managed 2 of them. Luckily I already had a set of metric taps so fairly easy to correct. I admit to being hesitant to take any of them out again to apply thread lock. I will just keep checking them regularly.

My one issue is that this set came from Hitchcocks (very well packaged) but the instructions came as a ridiculously small fold out sheet with minuscule printing (also not the same as the pdf file on the Hitchocks site). I needed a magnifying glass with a built in lamp (which I had). For some reason I can only guess at there are 8 M8 washers instead of the 4 as per the Hitchcocks version, and some have to be doubled up.

The set comes with a brake light extension plate to replace the original which is good. Detaching the under mudguard cover and then how to put it back again wasn’t very clear so it took a while to work it out.

In the end it is fitted, nothing left over and they look straight, and even better with the panniers attached.

Best Youtube video I found is the one by Old Man Ronin. Covers just about everything with excellent quality video mounted on a stand giving a steady picture - none of the crap head cam stuff that bounces around all over the place.
 

tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
My one issue is that this set came from Hitchcocks (very well packaged) but the instructions came as a ridiculously small fold out sheet with minuscule printing (also not the same as the pdf file on the Hitchocks site). I needed a magnifying glass with a built in lamp (which I had). For some reason I can only guess at there are 8 M8 washers instead of the 4 as per the Hitchcocks version, and some have to be doubled up.
[/QUOTE]
Here is the PDF version of the Pannier install instead of the microtiny font version. A note which may not be listed is to recheck the bolts you can access after 500 miles or so after the initial install.
 

Attachments

Bulldogfour

Getting there...
Location
Wiltshire UK
My one issue is that this set came from Hitchcocks (very well packaged) but the instructions came as a ridiculously small fold out sheet with minuscule printing (also not the same as the pdf file on the Hitchocks site). I needed a magnifying glass with a built in lamp (which I had). For some reason I can only guess at there are 8 M8 washers instead of the 4 as per the Hitchcocks version, and some have to be doubled up.
Here is the PDF version of the Pannier install instead of the microtiny font version. A note which may not be listed is to recheck the bolts you can access after 500 miles or so after the initial install.
[/QUOTE]
Thanks Tom_d I tried searching online for it but without luck.
 

MikeM

Well travelled
Location
So Cal USA
My one issue is that this set came from Hitchcocks (very well packaged) but the instructions came as a ridiculously small fold out sheet with minuscule printing (also not the same as the pdf file on the Hitchocks site). I needed a magnifying glass with a built in lamp (which I had). For some reason I can only guess at there are 8 M8 washers instead of the 4 as per the Hitchcocks version, and some have to be doubled up.
Those micro instructions were a joke at best. LOL
 

Caspice

Well travelled
Location
Here and There
Always nice to have another place to position your legs while enjoying a long ride. I had been using the top of the Givi engine guards as a rest but prefer something that keeps my feet closer to the lower controls. Found some inexpensive foot rests that can be attached to the engine guard.
6870
6871
the retaining screws supplied with kit are a tad long and the one on the right side of the photo is difficult to access with the 4mm hex
wrench.

marked a line at 5mm and hacksawed that portion off.
68736872
6874
Still long enough to tighten securely with a few threads left. Added some Loctite to all the hardware for a little extra saftey factor.
6875
6876
6877
6878
 

Caspice

Well travelled
Location
Here and There
I also regularly stand up to stretch but prefer to limit that to back roads. On highways/interstates where traffic is usually moving faster than I am my preference is to stay seated.


The foot pegs are offered by several sellers on amazon (and likely found on ebay). I paid about $22 USD
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BBCN6M41?ref=ppx_yo2ov_dt_b_product_details&th=1


The pegs are good in theory, but the design of the securing bracket does not work well in real world use.
6888



I had tightened the securing bracket to the point where I was pushing the limit and feared snapping the screw heads off (it happens sometimes).

6889
68906891


Folded the pegs out during my ride to the beginning of Section 6 of the MABDR yesterday. On a nice stretch of PA Rte 34 heading towards Mt Holly Springs I placed my feet on the pegs to get a little stretch. Rode over a bit of wavy road and that combined with vibration and the weight of my feet caused both pegs to move.

6892

You may look at the photo above and think that I did not adequately tightened the bracket.

The photo below shows where the ends of the securing screws penetrated the plastic buffer and dug into the Givi engine guard.

6894


The pegs would be more secure if this bracket was directly attached to the engine guard. May need to borrow my welder back from my buddy again.
68956896


A challenge in getting these mounted are the two cam bushings shown at the top of the photo below. These need to seat fully into both of the corresponding slots of the mounting bracket and the footpeg rest.
6897

Not abandoning these yet. If anyone else gets or has already used this GS ADV style foot rest, and has them securely mounted, please share your success.




I had "highway pegs" on my KLR that proved a worth while addition so would like to repeat the same functionality on my Himalayan.
https://www.happy-trail.com/eg4-engine-guard-highway-peg-kawasaki-klr650-all-years.html

6898
 

nmroadrunner

Well travelled
Location
New Mexico, USA
I also regularly stand up to stretch but prefer to limit that to back roads. On highways/interstates where traffic is usually moving faster than I am my preference is to stay seated.


The foot pegs are offered by several sellers on amazon (and likely found on ebay). I paid about $22 USD
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BBCN6M41?ref=ppx_yo2ov_dt_b_product_details&th=1


The pegs are good in theory, but the design of the securing bracket does not work well in real world use.
View attachment 6888



I had tightened the securing bracket to the point where I was pushing the limit and feared snapping the screw heads off (it happens sometimes).

View attachment 6889
View attachment 6890View attachment 6891


Folded the pegs out during my ride to the beginning of Section 6 of the MABDR yesterday. On a nice stretch of PA Rte 34 heading towards Mt Holly Springs I placed my feet on the pegs to get a little stretch. Rode over a bit of wavy road and that combined with vibration and the weight of my feet caused both pegs to move.

View attachment 6892

You may look at the photo above and think that I did not adequately tightened the bracket.

The photo below shows where the ends of the securing screws penetrated the plastic buffer and dug into the Givi engine guard.

View attachment 6894


The pegs would be more secure if this bracket was directly attached to the engine guard. May need to borrow my welder back from my buddy again.
View attachment 6895View attachment 6896


A challenge in getting these mounted are the two cam bushings shown at the top of the photo below. These need to seat fully into both of the corresponding slots of the mounting bracket and the footpeg rest.
View attachment 6897

Not abandoning these yet. If anyone else gets or has already used this GS ADV style foot rest, and has them securely mounted, please share your success.




I had "highway pegs" on my KLR that proved a worth while addition so would like to repeat the same functionality on my Himalayan.
https://www.happy-trail.com/eg4-engine-guard-highway-peg-kawasaki-klr650-all-years.html

View attachment 6898
Try inserting piece of old innertube between bracket and bar, perhaps?
 

MikeM

Well travelled
Location
So Cal USA
Those of you with several miles on your body odometer should realize that riding position is stressful to your lumbar spine and coccyx. Caveat emptor. YMMV
Birthing position is horrible for riding but its great to stretch your legs for a few minutes. Id never actually "ride" with the highway pegs.
 
Top Bottom