Squeeky rear suspension

Yangonnerd

Finally made it
Location
Kalaw, Myanmar
Hey peoples!

Please lend me your knowledge!
with about 1000km on the ODO, my rear suspension makes a squeeking sound every little bump/movement it makes.
I am not sure what to grease up, and i dont wanna randomly spray some WD-40 in that direction.

Anyone had any experience with this?

Thanks!
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
I you want to take it on properly you take apart the whole rear end plus suspension. Seems daunting the first time, but once you've done it it's really simple. Besides, RE is not always consistent in applying grease in the right parts and taking the suspension apart and greasing it thoroughly will save possible troubles later on, and give you some peace of mind.
Buy yourself a jar of good quality grease and get going. You only need basic tools to take it apart. Then grease up every bush and bearing and put it back together again.
Good luck!
 

grymsr

Well travelled
Location
Maine
Ditto to above. When I had to remove the rear shock to install lowering drop links, I found that the RE factory greasing was pretty sparse. When I reassembled I used waterproof grease on everything. Now it's slick as ****.
 

Yangonnerd

Finally made it
Location
Kalaw, Myanmar
So friends, im off to apply all your good tips. Just need some info on grease, the internets isnt clear enough for me. Petroleum grease? Lithium grease? what kind of grease would you use?
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
Imho that decision is up to you. Btw I forget what the book specs.
Around where I live waterproof boat bearing grease would be the most logical choice. I went with extreme pressure Moly grease for my purposes and will clean and inspect annually. The suspension pivot spindles precision ground and polished hardened steel and the bearings are needle rollers, the fit is good.
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
Don't know what is available in your area, but you could try the local truck garage and ask for wheel bearing grease.
I took the bits apart some 10k km ago and used roller bearing grease, didn't skim when applying it. I'm planning to take a look at the things again in October or so as part of the continuous maintenance program. Hopefully all right.

This mixing of greases was an interesting read, never thought about it that some greases might not be mixable.
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
Maybe take a look at this, post # 3:
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
Don't know what is available in your area, but you could try the local truck garage and ask for wheel bearing grease.
I took the bits apart some 10k km ago and used roller bearing grease, didn't skim when applying it. I'm planning to take a look at the things again in October or so as part of the continuous maintenance program. Hopefully all right.

This mixing of greases was an interesting read, never thought about it that some greases might not be mixable.
Most wheel bearing greases are Type 2 EP and comply with NLGI GC and LB , which are the highest rating for pressure and waterproofing.
Timken brand is not hard to find., but expensive. Fuchs specify a type two for motorcycle use but make no mention of the ratings.
You should already have some for your steering head bearings anyway-----!
RE upgraded their grease after early troubles with steering head bearings.
Sam who must not be named has the info on what it was changed too, but RE don't want you to know and made him remove the info from his site.
Fair chance RE use the same stuff on all roller bearings, but who knows?
 
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RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
Lots of good greases available and definitely completely clean out the old grease unless replacing with same (which I doubt anyone knows what that is or even obtainable outside India) because mixed grease combinations can result in chemical compositions that will attack or corrode some metals. Some grease mixes also result in a hardening of the grease, turning it into a hard cake compound.

At work if we find that an owner or one of our guys has accidentally mixed greases in a bearing assembly, say a rotor head or landing gear assembly, the aircraft is grounded until we tear it down, clean and relube. If we want to change greases, same thing, tear down, clean and service with new.

For swingarm and wheel bearings, as recommended in prior posts above, a good waterproof grease, preferably semi-synthetic or fully synthetic , works well. Synthetic greases don't separate and lose the base oil like petroleum greases do, which causes them to lose their adhesion and lubricating qualities, drying out and caking over time. If you repack yearly, petroleum based grease is fine, but if you rarely do your bearings I'd go with a synthetic.

Steering head and swing arm bearing are oscillating bearings, a back and forth rotation without making a complete revolution. Because of this, when you have access to them to lube, rotate them around several times during the cleaning and lube process to change position of the bearings. Otherwise the stresses, pressure and wear are always on the same area of the bearing. Rotating the individual bearings will double the wear life of roller and needle bearings and prevent wear notches.

I've been using Lucas Oil's "Red and Tacky #2"
waterproof lithium base grease in my wheel bearings, suspension, swingarm and steering head bearings for years with excellent results. It's an EP grease and I also use it on my Jeep and tractor and attachments. It has a high drop point, making it much more resistant to separation at high temps and won't wash out in water crossings. The stuff lives up to it's name because it's the stickiest, clingy grease I've ever seen.

Otherwise, as mentioned before, a good quality high pressure marine or boat trailer bearing grease will serve you well.
 
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Roy Gavin

Well travelled
Fuchs site actually suggests a Type one for for oscillating bearings, but then goes on to suggest a type 2 for use everywhere on motorcycles!

A high pressure rating is more important than waterproofing, the brown "rust" you might find in highly loaded bearings like steering head bearings is usually brinelling caused when grease with too low a rating is squeezed out and there is metal to metal contact which picks up tiny particles of metal from the hardened surfaces, and they oxidize PDQ.
Spreading the grease around by turning the bars from lock to lock a few times occasionally probably helps spread the grease around a bit too.
FWIW I am on the second set of head bearings on my BMW R80 G/S PD, first set did 270,000 km, second still OK at 510,000 , using the Timken grease and keeping them properly adjusted.
 

RotorWrench

Well travelled
Location
USA
Good info and true enough. Although improper lubrication and contamination are two cause of what's actually referred to as "false" brinelling. Vibration and excessive clearances are the other causes of false brinelling.

True brinelling is most often caused by static overload, improper bearing mounting or severe impact. That's where the name comes from, brinelling is named after the Brinell scale of hardness, in which a small ball is pushed against a hard surface at a preset level of force, hence, enough pressure to deform the race is called the brinelling.

I apologize, I know it's probably TMI here, but bearings and lubrication are a major part of my job, especially with helicopters, and we deal with bearing issues almost daily. It's pretty much properly maintained bearings that keep those egg beaters in the air 😉
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
Pls do not apologize, any technical information is welcome, especially from people who share their professional knowledge.
I'm not a technician myself and never and any significant training in the field, but I am very interested in almost anything technical, in particular when it is applicable for my bikes.
 

Yangonnerd

Finally made it
Location
Kalaw, Myanmar
Small little update:

Removed everything that needed to be removed, and followed a nice step by step guide on how to grease up everything from Leuheanrede.

The squeek was coming from the right side swingarm "bolt"(?).
Put some waterproof grease on it. It went great.
(Untill I for some reason leaned against my bike, pushing it slightly forward, making it fall off the center stand, landing on the swingarm and (with my wheel nearby on which the license plate holder decided to land) breaking off the liense plate holder, resulting in disappointment and a little sadness on my part.)

No more squeek tho! Bolted everything back to recommended torque.
And finished fabricating a repair for the license plate. Looks like new.
(Except for when viewing it from the under aide, then it'll look like that spiked head dude from Nightmare on Elm street...)

What a day :D
 
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