Sitting Mod 2 in the UK in Sep '21 lusting after a Himalayan

snmpwalker

Getting there...
Location
Dublin
Hi Folks,

Been a long-time admirer of the Himalayan. Is it just me who thinks it is drop-dead gorgeous Mad-max style?
Sitting my Mod 2 next week. Hopefully I pass, so I can go test-ride this handsome beast!!!

My other contenders -- RE Meteor 350 and 'maybe' the Interceptor 650.
 

Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
The Himalayan #1 or the Meteor #2 would be a better choice for a first bike in my opinion then the 650. Less power so things happen a little slower and a little lighter weight also helps. What ever one you get put some good crash bars on it.
 

petespace1

Well travelled
Location
Syd Aus
Hi Folks,

Been a long-time admirer of the Himalayan. Is it just me who thinks it is drop-dead gorgeous Mad-max style?
Sitting my Mod 2 next week. Hopefully I pass, so I can go test-ride this handsome beast!!!

My other contenders -- RE Meteor 350 and 'maybe' the Interceptor 650.
I completely get you mate 😀.
The Himmi does it to you. I spend more hours with it than my brilliantly put together german. The constant felltlability ( is there such a word?) is what makes it so engaging.
The nicest bunch of Himmi riders here makes it even more fun.
Good luck 🤞 with your test!
 

snmpwalker

Getting there...
Location
Dublin
Update: Mod 2 passed with 'no faults'...in pouring rain. It was absolutely chucking it down. Other instructors had gathered in the waiting area and were discussing how horrible it was. My feet were swimming in my boots. I have no idea how so much water got on the inside of them waterproof boots. Wore glove liners, latex gloves and then my summer gloves on top. Yet my hands were all wet. My tee shirt was wet too even though I wore a tee, then a puffer, then a rain-jacket and then my water-repellent motorcycling jacket from texpeed. It seems the ingress was from the back of the neck somehow. I had 2 neck scarves on....anyway...it was all totally worth it in the end! Now drying all that gear under a fan...a huge grin on my face...first thing I did was tear out the L plates on my learner bike! My instructor said it was rare that the examiner gave a 'no fault' to anyone so feeling quite chuffed!
 
Update: Mod 2 passed with 'no faults'...in pouring rain. It was absolutely chucking it down. Other instructors had gathered in the waiting area and were discussing how horrible it was. My feet were swimming in my boots. I have no idea how so much water got on the inside of them waterproof boots. Wore glove liners, latex gloves and then my summer gloves on top. Yet my hands were all wet. My tee shirt was wet too even though I wore a tee, then a puffer, then a rain-jacket and then my water-repellent motorcycling jacket from texpeed. It seems the ingress was from the back of the neck somehow. I had 2 neck scarves on....anyway...it was all totally worth it in the end! Now drying all that gear under a fan...a huge grin on my face...first thing I did was tear out the L plates on my learner bike! My instructor said it was rare that the examiner gave a 'no fault' to anyone so feeling quite chuffed!
Maybe the best way to ride in pouring rain is naked, with your clothes safely dry in the panniers etc? then when the rain stops towel off and get your dry clothes back on. :)
 
What is the one piece of advice you lot would give yourself if you could go back to when u started out riding?
To me it was learning that you end up going in the direction you were looking. After quite a few crashes I learned not to fixate on the obstacles in front of me. Also, always look as far into a turn as you can, turn your head and the bike will follow in that direction naturally.
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
Do a few trackdays to get better control of your bike and find out where the boundaries are of both yourself and of the bike. Then on the road start looking for everything: the road surface, hidden exits, blind car drivers.
 

snmpwalker

Getting there...
Location
Dublin
To me it was learning that you end up going in the direction you were looking. After quite a few crashes I learned not to fixate on the obstacles in front of me. Also, always look as far into a turn as you can, turn your head and the bike will follow in that direction naturally.
Golden advice...
 

modiorne

Well travelled
Location
Charlotte, NC
What is the one piece of advice you lot would give yourself if you could go back to when u started out riding?
To the young foolish me back when I started? ATGATT and get real instruction, not just my buddies "teaching me"... at least I always had a helmet on (likely saved my life or at least saved me from dain bramage). I likely wouldn't have listened to myself though... Yeah, I was that thick as a young teen. Much stupid, much scars.

Agree completely with using your head to point where you want to go, in fact, I get more specific and point my chin - learned that from mountain biking which translated back to when I restarted motorcycling again. Keeps my head and eyes "up".
 

sqeeezy

Well travelled
Location
Southern Spain
Learn to brake as hard as you can. Ride within your limits, which can change with weather, road conditions or the way you feel that day. Ride prominently so you're seen, but defensively as you're not so visible as a car. Cut the danger in two with the line that you take.
 

petespace1

Well travelled
Location
Syd Aus
1) Be a defensive / thinking rider - anticipate anticipate anticipate what others on the road are going to do.

Assumption: “know that there are many idiots also known as SMIDSYs (sorry mate I didn’t see you) on the road. Know that being on a bike you are likely to come out second best in a metal to metal meeting on the road.
 
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