searching for Himalayan accident machine...

kuebeldoktor

Total noob
Location
Germany
Hello Enfield himalayan owners,

I drive a Himalayan myself and together with my son I now had an idea:
Since my son is studying mechanical engineering and is also interested in a Himalayan, we would like to rebuild an accident machine together.
So he also learns mechanical engine and motorcycle knowledge and not just dry theory during his studies :)

So if someone in Europe, preferably in Germany and around, has a Himalayan accident machine that he no longer wants to repair, get in touch with me.
We will then clarify the price and transport options together.

Regards. Frank
 
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60sRetro

Finally made it
Location
Ontario
Interesting project, I hope it works out.

I launched a similar effort with my 19-yo son who is interested in mechanics. I picked up two 1972 CB 350s with a plan for us to bond together in my workshop building them into one working bike.

End result...Would have been nice if it had gone differently but I'm re-building a 50 year old CB350 by myself. I guess I over-estimated his interest.

Parenting is so much fun.
 
My grandson .. who lives with my wife and I .. along with his 2 sisters ... and our 3 year old boy ..

He studies Advanced Engineering at UTC Sheffield ...
All his interests are engineering based ... Solidworks, 3D printing, mechanical stuff ...

He will not consider a future in engineering ... not at all ...

Public service .. Police, paramedic, dog handler ....

But not Engineering .....

Baffled .....
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
When I took up structural engineering it was one of the easiest courses to get into.
Although it took me six A levels to get into a five O level course!
Back then you had to study in pretty much the same way you were taught at school, and actually sit exams at the end of the course set by a body external to the college.
So you didn't get something for just showing up!
And then you had to actually get a job and design something that worked and did not break / fall down.
So I can understand a certain reluctance to take up a profession where you actually have to achieve something, err, concrete, much better with something where you can waffle you way through without ever producing much which is open to cold factional analysis!
 
Interesting project, I hope it works out.

I launched a similar effort with my 19-yo son who is interested in mechanics. I picked up two 1972 CB 350s with a plan for us to bond together in my workshop building them into one working bike.

End result...Would have been nice if it had gone differently but I'm re-building a 50 year old CB350 by myself. I guess I over-estimated his interest.

Parenting is so much fun.
maybe he will enjoy riding it after you finish re-building
 
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