replacing a broken chain

puttbutt

Well travelled
Location
NY
while commuting to work this morning, my chain broke. I was able to retrieve it. the timing cover also has a hole in it . luckily I decided to take the local street instead of the highway like I normally do. looks like the master link is missing. can I just use the original chain to measure out the new one? Thanks.
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
The OEM chain is 110 links. I suggest -assuming that you use the standard sprockets- that you use that number.:giggle:
110 links total, that is 109 plus a master. (I reproduce this knowledge from The Other Site, in particular post 31306, Bomber 60015)
Or you could just replace the master link. That was the weakest link, if you replace it with a new one it should be the strongest.

For the cover : https://www.sparezo.com/products/himalayan/royal-enfield-himalayan-sprocket-cover or e-bay, second hand from 35 dollars American.
 

puttbutt

Well travelled
Location
NY
Not a good look, JB Weld maybe or a new cover?
might have to try the JB weld or some other epoxy first. If that doesn't work will have to probably replace it. I believe it's cast aluminum. got some aluminum welding rods that I might experiment with.
 

tom_d

Finally made it
Location
US
it's not the sprocket cover. its the main one. There were other pieces of broken aluminum inside when I took the sprocket cover off. Will have to clean it out to get a better look. Thanks
A new LH engine cover looks to be about $100 US or so. Brazing/soldering is also an option and would be plenty strong on this non-structural part. There are tricks to building up and bridging the gap for the missing part if you want, people use them to fill holes which they then ground to a good finish. Slow curing JB weld can work ok, you can use some aluminum soda can to help form the missing pieces, but that repair will probably affect resale a bit.
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
If you get it back together real quick super glue works fine, but after the even the tiniest bit of oxidation on the joints any adhesive is iffy.
A long time ago you could buy Lumiweld low temp alloy welding rods which worked OK in a low stress situation like this and melted with a propane torch.
Most welders leave alloy welding to specialists who have the gear, as it is quite a complex process, so if a cover is $100- it is probably the cheapest way to go unless you can find a bodger who will have a bash, or has some low temp rods.
 

puttbutt

Well travelled
Location
NY
did oil come out?
only when I took the cover off to see if any thing else was damaged. it looks like all the broken pieces are from the cover.
affect resale a bit.
don't plan on selling her. purchased some aluminum epoxy. would have to take off the stator coil and I believe the cable to the starter? which will damage the cover gasket to do any brazing.
super glue works fine
I'm usually a skeptic when it comes to superglue being able to mend anything. used it a few years back to mend a crack on a refrigerator door. lasted a couple of years, but then it came apart. thanks everyone for your tips. as soon as I get the epoxy, I'll see how it works. oh, and to those who celebrate Thanksgiving, Happy gobbler day!
 

puttbutt

Well travelled
Location
NY
saw an interesting video on chains that use a rivet instead of a master link. think I'll go that route, since I believe it was the master link that failed.
 
Top Bottom