Rear wheel wobble?

mpp1

Well travelled
Location
Gujarat, India
It's good that the shop manager understands the limitations of his crew and is willing to work with another shop to get things accomplished.
The shop he's sending the wheel to does rim work only, truing and straightening rims, fixing punctures on tubed tires and so on.
But some progress so yaay for me.
There's reports that the meteor 650 is most likely going to be released in December...finally!
If that happens then I will have to go for that and sell this baby.
Let's see what happens
 

Wooly

Getting there...
One issue I had previously- on a KTM and not a RE - my front wheel vibrated on the brakes and seemed a bit skittish - found front wheel out of true - spin wheel and could see the rim slightly rising and falling - basically the wheel was oval or eccentric - took it to be trued and was spot on after - obviously this only occurs on spoked bikes (unless you may have hit a land mine of course)
 

Overdrive

Well travelled
Location
Southern UK
Just a thought.
Assuming the rear wheel bearings are ok, and the swing arm is moving as it should and there’s no play in the swing arm pivot I’d be tempted to look at the steering head bearings for notchiness, which if present can cause all sorts of weird handling issues that feel like they’re coming from the rear of the bike.
 

mpp1

Well travelled
Location
Gujarat, India
Just a thought.
Assuming the rear wheel bearings are ok, and the swing arm is moving as it should and there’s no play in the swing arm pivot I’d be tempted to look at the steering head bearings for notchiness, which if present can cause all sorts of weird handling issues that feel like they’re coming from the rear of the bike.
I did have the front steering bearing greased as part of the 10k routine maintenance, the dance of the rear wheel still persists unfortunately
 

Overdrive

Well travelled
Location
Southern UK
I did have the front steering bearing greased as part of the 10k routine maintenance, the dance of the rear wheel still persists unfortunately
Are you sure they’re not too tight?
On the centre stand, with the rear wheel on the floor so the front wheel is in the air there should not be any resistance to moving the handlebars from full lock to full lock in either direction.
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
Some suggest that with just the sligtest tap from the centre position the forks should fall gently on to the stop.
According to the bearing suppliers you want just the slightest amount of preload on both bearings, easiest done with normal weight on the front wheel which loads the lower bearing and little more than removing all play in the top bearing - which is actually what the RE book says!
But most like the feel of just a little more preload on the top bearing, which is where the tap and gentle fall setting comes from.
 

mpp1

Well travelled
Location
Gujarat, India
Are you sure they’re not too tight?
On the centre stand, with the rear wheel on the floor so the front wheel is in the air there should not be any resistance to moving the handlebars from full lock to full lock in either direction.
That movement is ok, quite free in fact
 

portisheadric

Getting there...
Location
Bristol UK
Wheel runout should total no more than 1mm.

If this if is only happening on less than perfect road surfaces, ie gritty or sand covered my guess from prior experience would be the rear wheel is running alongside the bikes centre line and not on it.
Easy enough to check with a pair of straight edges clamped to the flattest section of the rear wheel and checking for 4 identical measurements off the front rim. If you cannot obtain 4 identical gaps no matter how the front wheel or rear wheel is positioned then somethings was either misaligned on the production line or has been since leaving it.
Had a badly fabricated swinging arm on an EFI that was twisted enough to position the bottom of the rear wheel almost an inch from where it should have been. Easy fix with the aid of a scaffold pole :)
 

Alan F.

Well travelled
I was thinking about this today too, my only thought was the chain adjusters are not adjusted the same amount. I probably already suggested this. Measure the distance from axle center to swingarm pivot center with a string or tape measure, then compare that measurement to the other side. If they don't match, your rear wheel is pointed to one side or the other, and not at the middle of your front wheel.
 

Almar

Well travelled
Location
South Wales
More years ago than I care to remember, (1960’s), yes I am that old I T -boned a van that came out of a side junction without stopping. Having learned how to fly, at least over the roof of the van, I hit the road hard.

God knows how but I wasn’t badly injured but the bike was.

The van driver’s company agreed to pay all costs to rebuild the bike, no insurance involved.

It came back looking better than before but, on entering a corner, it was unstable. I took it back to the bike-shop who insisted it was OK.

I didn’t believe them until one evening when I had had more to drink than I should have, (I know😱), I rode it home without any instability. I realised that I had been tensing up in corners. The “relaxed” ride meant I hadn’t been thinking about the problem. From that day on I had no further concerns with the bike. (This was pre-breathalyser days).

I am not suggesting that getting ratted is the answer but it is possible that you are now anticipating trouble and, subconsciously, causing it through tension.

Whatever the answer, good luck and happy riding.
 

Alan F.

Well travelled
The guy I got my CB160 project from (original owner) had quite a few stories to tell me about drinking and riding. Apparently he had a spot they all used to ride up to where they'd start a campfire before everyone passed out, I guess the sunrises were really good viewed from this spot.
 

mpp1

Well travelled
Location
Gujarat, India
I didn’t believe them until one evening when I had had more to drink than I should have, (I know😱), I rode it home without any instability. I realised that I had been tensing up in corners. The “relaxed” ride meant I hadn’t been thinking about the problem. From that day on I had no further concerns with the bike. (This was pre-breathalyser days).
I am not suggesting that getting ratted is the answer but it is possible that you are now anticipating trouble and, subconsciously, causing it through tension.
Whatever the answer, good luck and happy riding.
Haha, first, I live in a dry State so there's that.
Second, I never had the guts, ever, to ride when a bit "wet".
But you do make a compelling point my friend, I was so frustrated with the RE service center that I had them give me a test ride on another customer's bike and I kept thinking about the wobble, the other bike in much worse condition than mine which didn't make matter easier as well BTW.
But very fair point all in all.
 
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