Meteor 350 soon to be available in the US

Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
As the title says Meteor 350 soon to be available in the US. I have a friend that has one on order. If and when RE comes out with a 500cc version is when I’ll buy a Meteor.
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
As the title says Meteor 350 soon to be available in the US. I have a friend that has one on order. If and when RE comes out with a 500cc version is when I’ll buy a Meteor.
Specs look good for the type (British single)
There's other bikes ( different type) in the engine size neighborhood that make a few more horsepower but not as much torque. Knowing Enfield's tendency to over build and understress I'll bet that the engine can handle being punched out to 500.
 

Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
I was glad to see the 3.97 Gal fuel capacity but I’m surprised to see the wet 421 LB curb weigh. For some reason I was expecting it to be lighter. My 2010 Bullet 500 G5 UCI EFI is only 412 LB and my 2007 Bullet 500 AVL is 370 LB. Both having a little more HP and about 50% more torque.
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
Take the basic weight of a pre unit bullet ad the weight of hydraulic rear brake, fuel pump, ABS, counter balancer, catalytic converter. The weight would be about the same as the Meteor
The Meteor 350 makes 20 hp and 20 ft-lb torque like the previous 350's. No surprise because fuel economy is king in India.
 

Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
My RE riding buddy ordered a Supernova but my dealer is not going to be getting that model in the first round RE is sending to the dealership. So he is going to get a yellow Fire Ball and then add the rear backrest, windshield, and the triple bar cattle guard option.

It’s going to be interesting to see how well the 350 dose at freeway speeds, as it’s hard not using them to get around our cities here in the US.
 
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Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
A motorcycle on a California freeway is not my idea of fun. A motorcycle on a twisty back road through the canyons or vineyards is. Riding like a MOTO-GP racer doesn't allow much time to take in the sights and landscapes. I want to see more than just the road in front of me.
The Meteor is in no way a freeway bike. But when you are at a stop and go or at a crawl on your freeways at many times you are in your big cities the Meteor would make a good lane splitting bike. Lane splitting I wish all the rest of states allowed.
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
I'd have to ride a Meteor for myself to decide if it's freeway or not. I believe it's in a gray area in that regard based on the TQ and HP numbers.
Insanities like the freeways in SoCal or Rt-81 or the I 10 between Tucson and Phoenix yah no way, no thanks. Right lane camping the I-5 from Seattle to Portland, do-able. Big pieces of I -90 ok if your not in a hurry. Two lane Highways like the 101 should be no probs and much fun. I say this based on having done those on machines of equal and greater power.
 
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thresher

Well travelled
I used to live in Tucson and getting to Phoenix was a mother. The climb to Flagstaff would definitely not be good on a small displacement. But once on the reservation yeah it would work... The Gold Wing and the 1.8 VTX made every mountain flat... And the rocket three? Well everything was flatter
 
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Morgan60

Well travelled
Location
NW USA
What I liked best about the launch video are the parts with Sid Lal. The dudes is a real deal bike nut.
I agree 100% Sid Lal is a great guy. I wish he was back with all his hands on his family’s Royal Enfield company. I have my fingers crossed that a 500 Meteor is in the pipeline. RE has a rich history with single cylinder bikes. I can’t see them abandoning that and the 500 and the Bullet model.
 
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He can perhaps provide the vision. Production is driven by sales and market demand. They have to balance the demand from the India market with the overseas demand. They are caught between the technology of Japan and the low cost manufacturing of China. Its a thin line to maneuver. if the demand in the West and acceptance of the new designs come into play they may have more room for innovation. I wouldn't get too far ahead by attempting to manufacture too much too soon but rather come up with a model at a time that can fit the vision while at the same time satisfy the diversity of markets and still retain its uniqueness as the Himalayan does. Not an easy task.

You can also have the best engineering design ever and if you can't convince the finance guys who look at risk vs reward, time value of money, opportunity cost etc, it goes no where. been there.....
 
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