How to use the center-stand.

tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
I went into my garage today and tried getting it on the center stand using the suggestions listed here. NOPE!

I just can't grab anything with my right hand that's "behind" the pivot point. My panniers are in the way. But I'll keep trying.

It's like those 3D pictures that used to appear in our Sunday comics section. You can stare and stare and just see a blur. But then magically, you see the 3D image. I hope that's what happens here.
Ahhh, the center stand with panniers question. Part of it depends upon how often you need to centerstand it.
Option A and easiest
Take the left pannier off (or both if practicing) and see if you can find a comfortable grab point with leverage. The panniers come off quickly so it doesn't add much effort unless they are loaded or you need to put it up often or when out and about.
Option B
There are strap tie downs on the panniers, perhaps running one down, under, and up the other side (or with some interesting support runs) might give a handhold which would be helpful. As I don't have panniers, this is just spit-ball engineering in my head based on pictures of the RE panniers.
Hope there's something helpful here. :)
 

fog rider

Well travelled
Location
Alberta
Lots of good advice here.

My 2 cents:

Left hand on left grip, right hand grabbing the rail with an underhand grip
Bring the center stand down slowly with the ball of your right foot.
Make sure both center stand contact points are contacting the ground.
Once you're ready, quickly shift your weight off your left foot and pull up/back with your right arm at the same time. The shifting of your weight is just as important as pulling up on the rail.

Some bikes are easier to set on the center stand than others, but with a well-designed system, a light person can put a big bike up on the center stand quite easily.
Like anything, after a bit of practice I'm sure you'll get it. Have someone spot you on the right side of the bike while you're learning, if that helps.
 

Bulldogfour

Getting there...
Location
Wiltshire UK
You have to use the leverage available to you on the centre stand by standing with all your weight on the end of the small bar. Try and place the arch of your foot on the point and stand with all your weight on it whilst of course, trying to ease up and a little back. Be careful about using the ball of your foot to press down - you would not be the first person to damage their achilles tendon by pushing down with your toes too energetically. Not a common occurrence but not unknown.
 

tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
Everyone has blindspots or something they don't get the hang of, but best efforts to be helpful should always be welcome. As I noted above, the Himalayan with its panniers on have provoked questions on top of the normal centerstand questions before and appears to remove some of the best points of leverage so it's helpful they are so easy to remove and reinstall.
 

puttbutt

Well travelled
Location
NY
I always take the panniers off when I have to put the bike on the center stand when doing maintenance. otherwise I can't get a good grip anywhere. I'm vertically challenged. once the panniers are off, I grab the pannier bracket at it's lowest point and up she goes.
 

JimBob

Getting there...
Location
Dundee Scotland
Everyone has blindspots or something they don't get the hang of, but best efforts to be helpful should always be welcome. As I noted above, the Himalayan with its panniers on have provoked questions on top of the normal centerstand questions before and appears to remove some of the best points of leverage so it's helpful they are so easy to remove and reinstall.
After my 1st chain adjustment and wheel alignment, I will spend a couple of minutes to remove the panniers in future, those pannier corners are quite sharp and I bumped my head on them a few times, ouch...
 

Paleface

Getting there...
Location
Kerrville, Texas
Lots of good advice here.

My 2 cents:

Left hand on left grip, right hand grabbing the rail with an underhand grip
Bring the center stand down slowly with the ball of your right foot.
Make sure both center stand contact points are contacting the ground.
Once you're ready, quickly shift your weight off your left foot and pull up/back with your right arm at the same time. The shifting of your weight is just as important as pulling up on the rail.

Some bikes are easier to set on the center stand than others, but with a well-designed system, a light person can put a big bike up on the center stand quite easily.
Like anything, after a bit of practice I'm sure you'll get it. Have someone spot you on the right side of the bike while you're learning, if that helps.
Your description worked for me however, I had to face the rear of the bike keeping my right foot on the pad. It was then quite easy. Thanks
 

Caspice

Well travelled
Location
Here and There
Lots of great advice listed in this thread.

The ease of popping a motorcycle up onto its center stand can varying with each motorcycle. Neither of my older RE Bullets came with a side stand so there was no shortage of practice using the center stand. It became a mission to be able to pop the Bullet up while I was still straddling the motorcycle. And I was successful a few times, but it required a lot more muscle and coordination than standing next to it.

Very important to have both feet/pads of the center stand contacting the ground before beginning the push/pull effort. Easy enough to determine when both are in contact with the ground by pushing gently on the center stand tang with you right foot while stabilizing the motorcycle with your left hand on the handlebars and right hand on the rear anchor point. You will be able to feel the motorcycle sway slightly as you increase and decrease foot pressure.


An older and brief article on the subject.

https://www.cycleworld.com/2015/09/25/cycle-world-tips-and-tricks-how-to-use-your-motorcycle-centerstand/
 

MikeM

Well travelled
Location
So Cal USA
If you have lowered your bike you are at a greater disadvantage when trying to lever the bike up with the center stand so keep that in mind. Simple solution is to lift the bike and it will pop right up on the center stand with ease. ;-) Or roll the rear tire up on a 2x4 then try putting it on the center stand. Mucho easier.
 

Jester

Well travelled
Location
Northants, UK
The Himsy is actually quite a hard bike to get onto the centrestand compared to some others I own/owned. The CB500 is a doddle, the 900 Hornet is harder than the Himsy, the Tracer 9 easier and the XJR1300 [over quater of a ton when fuelled] was also easy. I have the RE luggage fitted to mine so have a convenient hand hold [red arrow], you may be able to use the pillion footrest hanger [green]. An additional note on technique is to put all your weight on the centrestand and do one smooth move rather than a 'clean and jerk' two stage weightlifting motion. As soon as you start putting your weight on the stand you should be pulling up/back. The video showing this is out of focus as the camera found the drive more interesting than my arse.

https://youtu.be/Jj_xrqMGTT0
 

Attachments

dabs

Well travelled
Location
Merseyshire
I find mine so easy to put on the centre stand (flat ground) simply stand on the centre stand arm with my weight and up she goes.
 

Dabrakeman

Finally made it
Location
Michigan, USA
IF truly on a flat surface it takes very little effort at all. Stand on the center stand with your right foot and lift with the right hand (arm is pretty straight). Your body will swing backward with the bike. Just make sure you are not on a slight nose down surface. If so it will be much harder.
 

eamartin

Getting there...
Location
80517
I have a centerstand on my KLR and it takes some practice to get it on the centerstand. I test drove a HImalayan, and compared to the KLR, getting the bike up onto the Himalayan centerstand is a bit easier. I am considering the Himalayan, which I would like to lower 1-1/2" but I see no sources for a "lowered" centerstand. With the Himalayan on the centerstand and with the correct size tires what is the distance between the bottom of the rear tire and the ground?
 

Paleface

Getting there...
Location
Kerrville, Texas
IF truly on a flat surface it takes very little effort at all. Stand on the center stand with your right foot and lift with the right hand (arm is pretty straight). Your body will swing backward with the bike. Just make sure you are not on a slight nose down surface. If so it will be much harder.
Also helps to have it in netural.
 

Woodstock

Well travelled
Location
Woodstock, NY
Clearly I am not as technically challenged as I believed. It is heavy but I never had issues getting my Interceptor on the stand. 5 ft 7 and 177 pounds. It is not something I even thought about. Same dynamic as every other bike i have put on the center stand. You do it once or twice, you will do it every time. Thinking about it, I lift up with strength, slight pull back and let the momentum roll it back on the stand. Almost a rolling motion. Left hand on the left hand grip, right hand on the hand rail under the seat and right foot on the stand holding it to the ground. Yes, be sure both feet of the stand are on the ground when you begin the pull up. The bike is also vertical at that point.
 
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