A bit of a surprise reading the manual...

m1ckDELTA

Well travelled
The instructions for washing the bike seem to imply that nothing is waterproof or eater resistant. Videos I've seen appear to demonstrate the opposite.

No 24 hour clock.
 
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tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
Something to ponder, and some maths. :)
1 psi is equal to the downward pressure of a column of water 2.3 feet high (at 4c). Most home pressure washers look to be around 1700 psi at the nozzle to start, and go to 4000 or so. The car wash is going to be at least 1200 at the tip, or its not cleaning your car. :) Those pressures likely equate to submersion in hundreds of feet of water when indirect or at a modest distance.
I suspect on the Himalayan, pressure washers easily force water into any sealed area which receives direct application of water. Probably affected are chains, steering bearings, wheel bearing, electrical junctions, etc.
 

Eatmore Mudd

Moderator
Staff member
Once a year or so...during rainy season...I spritz it with soapy water from a spray bottle then ride somewhere and let mother nature do the rinsing. I do keep up with stuff like chain, fork seals etc. year round.
 

MikeM

Well travelled
Location
So Cal USA
If you do use a pressure washer you don't have to get up close and blast it. Keep your distance and put a rinse tip on the gun. I wouldn't spray water anywhere near the instrument cluster of the triple clamp bearing area. Those bearings seem to be made of metallic powder and go to hell when they get wet. LOL
 

tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
@m1ckDELTA , I really liked this question, growing up around touchless carwashes had me assuming it was normal everywhere and used for any vehicle. Your curiosity triggered my curiosity and reminds me how it has been a interesting journey in appreciating and enjoying my Royal Enfield. It turns out, at least 5 years ago, you couldn't just drive around until you find the local car wash stalls, and when you do find a car wash, it is a person. I don't know if touchless car wash stations or bays have become more available, but they don't appear to be if people living abroad in India who post about missing them is any indication. I found this Forbes article from 5 years ago whose video shows people washing their own cars (for those who can afford them) with a 5 gallon bucket of water and is an advertisement for a steam cleaning alternative which uses and wastes less water and is more hygienic as its benefits.

One part of the RE journey for me has been seeing and appreciating what the real differences and constraints are that lead them to engineering solutions as they do.
 

m1ckDELTA

Well travelled
@m1ckDELTA , I really liked this question, growing up around touchless carwashes had me assuming it was normal everywhere and used for any vehicle. Your curiosity triggered my curiosity and reminds me how it has been a interesting journey in appreciating and enjoying my Royal Enfield. It turns out, at least 5 years ago, you couldn't just drive around until you find the local car wash stalls, and when you do find a car wash, it is a person. I don't know if touchless car wash stations or bays have become more available, but they don't appear to be if people living abroad in India who post about missing them is any indication. I found this Forbes article from 5 years ago whose video shows people washing their own cars (for those who can afford them) with a 5 gallon bucket of water and is an advertisement for a steam cleaning alternative which uses and wastes less water and is more hygienic as its benefits.

One part of the RE journey for me has been seeing and appreciating what the real differences and constraints are that lead them to engineering solutions as they do.

Before moving to California, washing my motorbike in the driveway was a normal thing. It certainly was not a costly civil code violation.
 
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PeterE

Getting there...
Location
California
Before moving to California, washing my motorbike in the driveway was a normal thing. It certainly was not a costly civil code violation.
Growing up in Southern California in the late 70's-early 80's, we just washed everything into the gutter, coolant, soap, concrete cleaner, whatever. Now, I take my son for walks along the creek near our house and know that everything in our neighborhood drains into that creek. Needless to say, I've changed my ways.
 
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