2021 Himalayan Maintenance/Upgrades

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Having just bought and brought home my new-to-me Himalayan, have been perusing the forums regarding issues, and what I should be aware of. There are the normal electronic upgrades such as a cell phone, USB and GPS mount. Will install a separate switched accesssory fuse block.

Read up on the battery issue, will be monitoring and testing battery now going on two years old. Have a good battery tester that gives the internal health of the battery, as well as a load test. Can check charging system.

The parasitic power drain will be looked at as well. Seems to be centred around the regulator-rectifier (RR). The diodes in the shunt RR can be tested. There are upgrade possibilities such as the Shindengen FH020AA - a shunt RR. There are series RRs that can be used effectively as well such as the Shindengen SH775 - older technology but still a series RR and widely used in the ATV and watercraft world, and SH847. The SH 847 would be overkill. Offshore, inexpensive RRs are available, and have been used successfuly, can't be any worse than the QA regarding the Royal Enfield OEM RR.

Will document what I find as I go forward.

Cheers
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
The two choices for an RR is a shunt RR, as installed, or a series RR. Not a lot of space to be had. The shunt RR can be tested, the series RR cannot - either works or it does not. Only need an RR that can handle approximately 15 to 18 amps - 221 watts/12VDC = 18 amps, or if you are a purist of sorts 221 watts/14 VDC = 15 amps, this is becasue the electrical system operates at ~14.2 VDC - RR reference voltage. Wonder if there is a stator with a higher wattage that fits the Himilayan?

The two series RRs that I mention are good for over 30 amps. The SH847 can handle 50 amp loads. The FH020AA should be capable of at least 35 amps.

I tend to defer to amps when thinking about the electrical system.

Like the series RR in that it is placed in the power flow and acts as an on/off valve depending on the electrical system requirement:
Series Regulator.jpg
The shunt RR monitors the voltage in the electrical system from the side, and dumps excess to ground, or not:
Shunt-regulator.jpg

My preference is a series RR, but will have to look at the fit - the OEM RR is quite small. Have read that the stator operates cooler when using a series RR, have seen pics of this as well. Before any tweaking of the RR, will monitor battery level for state of charge.

Will be discussing a battery with the local dealer, a great Mom and Pop shop.
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Have installed a Battery Tender Voltmeter where the tender would connect. Doing this to monitor the battery state of charge daily. Will do a load test and battery health check soon.

Battery drain through the RR diode(s) seems to be after a time. Monitoring battery state of charge every now and then will help in this regard.

Installed last night - 12.6 VDC. This morning 12.6 VDC:
Battery Tender Voltmeter.jpg

Won't hurt to do this for a week. Intend to install a USB connector that has a battery voltage readout:
USB-Voltmeter.jpg
 

Flicka

Well travelled
Location
Italy
The parasitic power drain is caused from the gear position sensor that is wired directly to the battery through the R/R circuit. At the link you find the solution, simply as cut a wire and reroute it on a circuit controlled by a relay.

 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
The parasitic power drain is caused from the gear position sensor that is wired directly to the battery through the R/R circuit. At the link you find the solution, simply as cut a wire and reroute it on a circuit controlled by a relay.

Just one man's opinion, does not mean it is 100% correct or is the only reason , just that it is one of them, and has worked for him .
FWIW I have never suffered from parasitic loss on my old 2017 bike, always park in neutral and fitted the best battery I could find.
And of course in Oz we dont have to park our bikes for winter!
These sort of problems are not uncommon on other bikes and have been the subject of much discussion on other forums.
Universal solutions seems to be to get a Mosfet R/R with HD connections and only connect the output direct to the battery , and deal with any other connections appropriately. And Hitchcocks seem to have worked out what wiring changes are appropriate.
Might be overkill on the Hima, but I like to spend the money upfront and " do it once, do it right" at my age life is to short to experiment when I know of something which will work.
And when I offer advice as much as possible I like it to be from my own experience which has worked for me, not secondhand opinion.
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
The Himalayan does not have a monopoly on issues. My '85 Gold Wing has issues, as do other bikes. Older technologies are routinely replaced with new. The CX500/650 forum is a wealth of knowledged when trying to keep the '82/'83 turbo fuel injected bikes on the road. Not all bikes of the same year and manufacturer suffer from the same issue, some never do.

I will continue to peruse the forums, read of the experiences, talk to those here that ride these bikes, and determine what needs to be done. Checking the battery with the Battery Tender Voltmeter now, and periodically in the future, and doing the same type of procedure for other concerns will be the way ahead. I might be one of the lucky ones that never has an issue. Won't know until something happens.

Until then, intend to ride this spirited steed. Keeping it in the 3K to 5K RPM range in all gears and realizing that it is a 100 KPH bike all day long, is going to make this a very enjoyable ride.

Cheers
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Had a good morning riding, and visiting the Mom and Pop Royal Enfield shop. Coffee was good, as was the conversation and treats - butterscotch cookies.

Good discussion on the Himalayan. Bought the Seat Concept upgrade, should get it on this week. There was a Himalayan on the floor with the Seat Concept upgrade. Tried the fit, much better than the OEM stock or touring seat.

Discussed rear brakes, parasitic power drain, Stator size, and electronic additions.

The rear brakes are a bit lacking, but was told that becasue the bike is so new, now have 650 Kms on it, the rear brakes should improve with time.

The parasitic power drain was confirmed, but I was told not to sweat it. Riding daily or thereabouts, should keep this at bay, but if going away for a while, battery tender, disconnect the negative battery connection(s), or take out the "charging" fuse.

Stator size regarding heated clothing, hand warmers, and electronics should noy be an issue.

Gas is up to $1.89 CDN ($1.50 USD) a litre - $5.57 USG, analysts mention it will probably be $2.00 CDN a litre - $9.00 CDN for an imperial gallon before too long. Himalayan is going to get a lot of kilometers on it.

Nothing too taxing regarding this bike. Time to relax, monitor and ride.
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Mentioned I had purchased the Seat Concept dual sport/touring seat upgrade. Started on it Wednesday, got the seat foam changed and glued down yesterday, but my air stapler broke, and the T=50 stapler just didn't do the trick. Decided to take the easy way out and take to an auto upholstery shop. The shop couldn't give me a firm price, so I took it back this morning, borrowed a B&D stapler - no joy.

The local KMS Tool store had a Bynford upholstery air stapler on sale. Took the seta in and trialed the stapler in the store. Wanted to make sure the staples would go into the pan - worked. Bought the stapler and staples:
Upholstery Stapler.jpg
About an hour, take my time, and $60.00 for stapler and staples, seat installed. Cheaper than the auto upholstery shop I would think. Have the stapler for the next job.

On bike and looks good.
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Thanks

Been thinking of long term spare parts to have on hand. My bike is EFI and it will suffer the same fate as all EFI bikes such as evolution of the parts, parts manufacturing, and such - similar to my '85 Honda Gold Wing Limited Edition Computerized Fuel Injection (CFI) model. Not that a work around could not be done, but original OEM part(s) are much easier. Cost of parts up front is generally less expensive than trying to find later on. New parts in the Gold Wing CFI system are no longer available, and a work around mod has been developed/used, or an aftermarket part has been modified to suit.

With this in mind, thinking the EFI system parts will be the focus of this. Won't be doing any buying just yet, need to ride for a bit and determine the longevity of the bike in my possession.

Parts considered are:

ECU
Injector
Throttle Position Sensor (TPS)
Various sensors such as air temp and such

Mention the TPS becasue it's a key element in the EFI system, but generally has the least amount of quaity control/quality assurance applied to the manufacturing.

Have to get the OEM service manual, been looking already, to read up on the system.

Have been perusing the forum(s) to learn about the different experiences people have had.

Just a thought or two to keep me engaged, and distracted from my other two bikes.
 

khardung

Well travelled
Location
UK
Thanks

Been thinking of long term spare parts to have on hand. My bike is EFI and it will suffer the same fate as all EFI bikes such as evolution of the parts, parts manufacturing, and such - similar to my '85 Honda Gold Wing Limited Edition Computerized Fuel Injection (CFI) model. Not that a work around could not be done, but original OEM part(s) are much easier. Cost of parts up front is generally less expensive than trying to find later on. New parts in the Gold Wing CFI system are no longer available, and a work around mod has been developed/used, or an aftermarket part has been modified to suit.

With this in mind, thinking the EFI system parts will be the focus of this. Won't be doing any buying just yet, need to ride for a bit and determine the longevity of the bike in my possession.

Parts considered are:

ECU
Injector
Throttle Position Sensor (TPS)
Various sensors such as air temp and such

Mention the TPS becasue it's a key element in the EFI system, but generally has the least amount of quaity control/quality assurance applied to the manufacturing.

Have to get the OEM service manual, been looking already, to read up on the system.

Have been perusing the forum(s) to learn about the different experiences people have had.

Just a thought or two to keep me engaged, and distracted from my other two bikes.
Don't know how long term you're thinking, but I converted to carb to avoid some of the over complication that modernity brings. Also made it much simpler when I upgraded to a big bore kit. Just a jet change rather than faffing around with software downloads which may or may not work.
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Long term - subjective at best; however, good question. Will long term spare parts accumulation help in selling this bike if I did, probably not. From what I have experienced to date, only been a week and some 600 Kms, this is a good bike to keep. The KLR 650 has 40 HP and the 650 V-Strom has 66 HP. There are mods and add ons for these as well, but that's money to be spent. The fuel economy of this bike is very good. Did a fuel consumption of the road trip today - 256 Kms used 7.7 litres, 33 Kms per litre - me likes. Fit and finish, time will tell. I don't have a long list of items I would add.

Having mentioned this, and knowing everything will increase in price, acquiring specific parts/kits may be a good idea at this time. Thinking of the 462 big bore kit and Powertronic controller -approximately $1000.00 Euros - $1380 CDN. A good chunk of change, but I have spent this on new Hagon rear shocks for my '85 GW. I mentioned this big bore kit to a friend who rode HDs for years, and we agreed that if a rebuild was required, that would be the time to do this upgrade.

A riding friend who has had several HDs ove rthe years, continues to have the engine reworked before it is ever delivered. A lot of HD riders do this - spend $40K on a bike then dump another $10K to do mods/improvements.

Could just buy a new bike should the engine need work. Price of the bike is more, and never know, will have more technology installed getting away from the reason you ride one of these.

Having mentioned the above, will be adding the big bore kit and controller to my list. Need to win the loto.:cool:(y)
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Don't know how long term you're thinking, but I converted to carb to avoid some of the over complication that modernity brings. Also made it much simpler when I upgraded to a big bore kit. Just a jet change rather than faffing around with software downloads which may or may not work.
Thought about the carb issue. The reason I have the '85 1200 Gold Wing Limited Edition is that it is an FI model. My father was a mechanic all his life, and when FI cars came out as the norm, he thought he'd won the loto - especially in the winter. FI is better if you have to lay your bike up for a long period of time, and if you find an older FI bike that has been off the road for a long while, generally easier to get going in my experience. I mentioned in my last post having the big bore kit available for install at a later date with the Powertronic unit, should be okay for a while.
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
Ordered the side bags, strap clips, and straps. This will get me going. Lots of other attachment options, but that will be determined as needed. Going to figure out how to secure these bags to deter others that may want them.

Back Pack.jpgStrap Clips.jpgstraps.jpg
 

tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
Having just bought and brought home my new-to-me Himalayan, have been perusing the forums regarding issues, and what I should be aware of. There are the normal electronic upgrades such as a cell phone, USB and GPS mount. Will install a separate switched accesssory fuse block.

Read up on the battery issue, will be monitoring and testing battery now going on two years old. Have a good battery tester that gives the internal health of the battery, as well as a load test. Can check charging system.
Not everyone has battery issues, I do think that the small phantom drain when the bike is off, and the repeated draining of the battery which can happen is what damages and eventually kills the majority of them as simply keeping the battery on a tender looks to resolve the issue.

The parasitic power drain will be looked at as well. Seems to be centred around the regulator-rectifier (RR). The diodes in the shunt RR can be tested. There are upgrade possibilities such as the Shindengen FH020AA - a shunt RR. There are series RRs that can be used effectively as well such as the Shindengen SH775 - older technology but still a series RR and widely used in the ATV and watercraft world, and SH847. The SH 847 would be overkill. Offshore, inexpensive RRs are available, and have been used successfuly, can't be any worse than the QA regarding the Royal Enfield OEM RR.

Will document what I find as I go forward.

Cheers
You may buy a fix for the parasitic drain from Hitchcock's Motorcycles in England. What is does is pull power for the Gear Position Sensor through the switched power of the rear brake light instead of tapping into the R/R connection. It's an easy fix, there is also a DIY instruction on how to accomplish the same. These should result in a parasitic draw of < 1 Ma at which point I suspect at that point the self discharge rate may be nearly as big a factor.
Plug and play fix.
https://accessories.hitchcocksmotorcycles.com/accessory-shop/Charging/46817

DIY fix, translated from French, which still feels like magic to me.

Anyways, the parasitic draw has been tracked down and verified as being caused by a newer revision of gear position sensor (GPS) which plugged in between a couple of connectors of the R/R circuit to pull a 12V wire to the added "mystery box" on the 4th wire now on the GPS. An earlier version of the Himalayan did not have it and those parts are available from the Indian OEM parts dealers on Ebay, this may be why Indian and some of the earlier Himalayans didn't receive this particular complaint. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

BTW, I didn't understand what "the QA regarding the Royal Enfield OEM RR." meant, could you explain?
-Tom
edited: changed "> 1 Ma" to "< 1 Ma"
 
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tom_d

Well travelled
Location
US
The two choices for an RR is a shunt RR, as installed, or a series RR. Not a lot of space to be had. The shunt RR can be tested, the series RR cannot - either works or it does not. Only need an RR that can handle approximately 15 to 18 amps - 221 watts/12VDC = 18 amps, or if you are a purist of sorts 221 watts/14 VDC = 15 amps, this is becasue the electrical system operates at ~14.2 VDC - RR reference voltage. Wonder if there is a stator with a higher wattage that fits the Himilayan?

The two series RRs that I mention are good for over 30 amps. The SH847 can handle 50 amp loads. The FH020AA should be capable of at least 35 amps.

I tend to defer to amps when thinking about the electrical system.

Like the series RR in that it is placed in the power flow and acts as an on/off valve depending on the electrical system requirement:
View attachment 4465
The shunt RR monitors the voltage in the electrical system from the side, and dumps excess to ground, or not:
View attachment 4466

My preference is a series RR, but will have to look at the fit - the OEM RR is quite small. Have read that the stator operates cooler when using a series RR, have seen pics of this as well. Before any tweaking of the RR, will monitor battery level for state of charge.

Will be discussing a battery with the local dealer, a great Mom and Pop shop.
Luckily at least on the 2018+ models, there is mainly an absence of problems reported with electricity or a lack of enough of it from what I have seen. Perhaps it is because they bumped up the power by 50 watts to 221 watts at 1500 RPM in 2018. I've seen some people suggesting switching to cool running MOSFET's, but until recently wasn't able to figure out what kind of R/R was in the Himalayan except that is a shunt type. I finally ran across this patent document last week, though it was hard to track down for some reason without the patent number. According to this, it is a MOSFET shunt type R/R. It appears that the Himalayan R/R is very modern in design, cooler running than SCR type, and more efficient which may in part explain its smallish size.

The USB adapters you bought look perfect for checking your load and as long as you don't see a voltage drop you should be golden. Since the stator is always putting out full power and the shunt regulator is converting the excess into heat to control voltage, the R/R will actually run a bit cooler as you use more of the available electricity. Your 2018+ stator will be fine as it appears to be correctly designed (as opposed to tons of other makes of bikes) and shouldn't have issues unless you modify or over-stress the engine in some way to create lots of additional heat. As far as things to address, the bike is pretty solid though there might be a couple of areas to regress, mine has been fine. I would however look at the length of the side stand and see if it needs to be shortened as they used to be quite tippy as well as look into an upgraded seat if original. They changed the side stand and seat on the newest models to address both of those pain points. :)

In this patent document below, figures 30, 32, 34, 50, 52, and 54 are listed as MOSFET's and not the less efficient (hotter) thyristor.
Patent-Rectifier-Regulator-Himalayan.jpg

There is some additional information on the regulator and why they chose a shunt type in the service manual, older RE's appear to be series type. Simplicity, durability, ability to handle more amperage, and not get hotter as more power is output into the bike and battery look like benefits. The ability to push start the bike without a battery, which is a little more of a challenge with EFI but should still doable with a really long steep hill or powered off another riders rear tire, is another advantage over the series based R/R as well of aligning with the stated goals to make it a go anywhere machine that can be fixed with simple tools and materials.
Shunt_vs_Series.png

-Congrats on your purchase, happy adventures. sorry for the way too long of post. :)
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
Um - Flash seemed to have been granted a patent for their " Mosfet " RR in the USA in 2018 , but the technology has been around for a bit longer than that, over 20 years
Which might explain the current dispute between them and RE.
The reasons for using them have been around for the same time, the subject has been done to death on just about every bike forum known to man!
 

Rednaxs60

Well travelled
tom_d - mentioned the QA aspect because I viewed a YouTube rgearding the parasitic draw and the fellow found the RR to be faulty, older bike and he was not impressed with the RR failing.

Nice to read that the newer RE RRs use the more modern MOSFET technology. Agree that the power load should be optimized, use more in the electrial system and the RR will benefit from this, not having to shunt excess power to ground - less heat generated. If I had to replace the OEM RR might go with the Polaris series RR SH775.

The interesting aspect of an RR is that it can be made to work on just about any bike/atv and such. As long as the amperage rating is sufficient, and wiring is connected properly, all's well. Sent an RR from an '84 Honda Gold Wing to a fellow in Vancouver for his Suzuki 1000 cc V-strom three years ago. He installed it and it works a treat - still going strong.

Have upgraded the seat to Seat Concepts dual sport /touring seat - much better.

Not a lot of extras to install. Already has Oxford hand grip warmers. Can use my heated liner - plug into the battery tender connector. USB and GPS connections is just about it. Have the Admore Lighting light bar that I will install above the license plate - has taillight, brakelight, turn signal functions. Thought about installing the STS - Smart Turn signal unit (took it off my V-Strom when I sold it) so signal lights would automatically cancel, but juries out on this.

Side bags ordered. Look forward to installing these.

Have to get in the habit of lubing the chain. Like shaft drive - my '85 Honda Goldwing. My Spyder has a belt drive so easy as well.
 
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