Update on Itchyboots

Wintrup

Well travelled
Location
Cumbria UK
I can't help but muse on such things as these and be a naysayer from time to time to burst hype bubbles. So with that in mind.
This sort of travel is entertaining to watch at times, but doesn't really impress me. My favourite motorcycle world traveller was Ted Simon who, despite being mechanically unskilled, relied on 'road magic', blind faith and optimism to travel the globe and negotiate the hazards. He was woefully ill equipped for the journey by today's standards, but did it anyway. It was seat of the pants stuff, travel without a (inter)net. There must have been many, men and women, who didn't write books or get any recognition for their solo motorcycle travel feats. But with each new generation becoming more risk adverse and the world, and skill sets, shrinking due to technological advancement and globalism, these forays are travels into the mostly knowable, not the unknowable.

My best travel memories are of having no inkling where my next meal was going to come from or where I was going to sleep that night. It was under those conditions that I encountered both the kindness and hostility of strangers. They were travels and travails, triumphs and failures that teased out the best and the worst in me and others. True adventure is travel without certainty. This isn't an attack on Itchyboots, she's a woman of our times, of post-modernity and a global culture that is becoming less diverse each year. Many of our lives are more comfortable, but comfort and safety nets remove much in the process. In a way it's why I bought a Himalayan. I wanted to move away from the bells and whistles of the latest bikes, to a cruder, simpler machine. This year I let my European breakdown insurance go. If I get a mechanical failure now, I'm either going to have to fix it myself or find a way somehow to get by. Someone can post the Monty Python skit now about the good ol' days of living in a puddle.
 

TN_twowheeladdict

Well travelled
Location
Tennessee
What draws me to Noraly's videos, besides the fact that she is on a Himalayan , is that they don't feel contrived.

Her portrayal of innocent wonderment, and her interactions with the local people is what kept me watching.

Sure, there are those who adventure without Vlogging. That is their choice.

Someone portraying themselves as unprepared in order to get views is not something I am interested in.

Someone truly not prepared is just stupid because the knowledge is available, and those that don't make use of what is available are just asking for trouble.
 

CarstenB

Well travelled
Location
h-town tx
yet you're using the internet to communicate with the world and probably won't leave your cell phone at home on tour travels ;) Are you still using paper maps? I also don't think that the Himalayan is that much more service friendly than other modern bikes. The key parts to keep it running are not really road-side serviceable. If it breaks down you'll either have to tow it or leave it behind to get spare parts which won't be on the shelf at the next bike dealer. Maybe you should get a Tiger 500 instead :) Don' get me wrong, Simon and Pirsig were my heroes too and i often miss those times but i also enjoy the advantages of modern technology.
 

Jerk

On a long leash
Staff member
Very well written!

I have to give her a lot of credit. She's venturing into places I personally would be very nervous about. I was quite nervous last year leading up to my bike trip in Russia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and Armenia. I can't imagine what crossing into Iran and skirting Afghanistan with just a river separating your from the Taliban must be like. Its all very impressive to do these things as a woman, IMHO. Next, she's going to ride Patagonia to Alaska. I don't think I would risk that one, myself. South American can be very dangerous.
 

Kiwiscoot

Well travelled
The fact is that we get desensitised with all the vlogging on the internet of peoples travels. Our brains trive on novelty and the novelty wears off with all the travel stuff. We sit on our couch in comfort and compare the entertainment value and our perceived idea of the danger level guides our entertainment judgement. Is the two English dudes who crossed Siberia on a scooter and sidecar in winter "real" travellers in comparison to prepared/informed travellers? Is their story more novel and entertaining? Not IMO, I think those two dudes were a bit insane and could've well died. Their story is no greater than Norily's story. All the stories are good, all have gems of experience, except the ones where I get the impression that it's done for financial gain/advertising and not for the love of travelling, those I tune out of pretty quickly.
 

Shearboy

Finally made it
Location
USA CO
Very well written!

I have to give her a lot of credit. She's venturing into places I personally would be very nervous about. I was quite nervous last year leading up to my bike trip in Russia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and Armenia. I can't imagine what crossing into Iran and skirting Afghanistan with just a river separating your from the Taliban must be like. Its all very impressive to do these things as a woman, IMHO. Next, she's going to ride Patagonia to Alaska. I don't think I would risk that one, myself. South American can be very dangerous.

I am impressed by her travels and easy nature , I'm not so afraid for her in South America as I am for her in the US ! Most motels in SA have somewhere to put a bike away safely , not so in the states . I go to Mexico quite often and never worry much for my bike and self but when I get back to the States and am traveling back to CO I spend half the night peering out the window to my bikes !!!
I have spent time in Chile ,Peru and Bolivia and have never had a problem at all . Folks are very friendly to dumb ass gringos , just make the attempt to speak Spanish and they will look after you , don't be an ignorant know it all tourist !
 

Shearboy

Finally made it
Location
USA CO
I can't help but muse on such things as these and be a naysayer from time to time to burst hype bubbles. So with that in mind.
This sort of travel is entertaining to watch at times, but doesn't really impress me. My favourite motorcycle world traveller was Ted Simon who, despite being mechanically unskilled, relied on 'road magic', blind faith and optimism to travel the globe and negotiate the hazards. He was woefully ill equipped for the journey by today's standards, but did it anyway. It was seat of the pants stuff, travel without a (inter)net. There must have been many, men and women, who didn't write books or get any recognition for their solo motorcycle travel feats. But with each new generation becoming more risk adverse and the world, and skill sets, shrinking due to technological advancement and globalism, these forays are travels into the mostly knowable, not the unknowable.

My best travel memories are of having no inkling where my next meal was going to come from or where I was going to sleep that night. It was under those conditions that I encountered both the kindness and hostility of strangers. They were travels and travails, triumphs and failures that teased out the best and the worst in me and others. True adventure is travel without certainty. This isn't an attack on Itchyboots, she's a woman of our times, of post-modernity and a global culture that is becoming less diverse each year. Many of our lives are more comfortable, but comfort and safety nets remove much in the process. In a way it's why I bought a Himalayan. I wanted to move away from the bells and whistles of the latest bikes, to a cruder, simpler machine. This year I let my European breakdown insurance go. If I get a mechanical failure now, I'm either going to have to fix it myself or find a way somehow to get by. Someone can post the Monty Python skit now about the good ol' days of living in a puddle.

I believe that was living in shoebox in middle of road !
 

TN_twowheeladdict

Well travelled
Location
Tennessee
I am impressed by her travels and easy nature , I'm not so afraid for her in South America as I am for her in the US ! Most motels in SA have somewhere to put a bike away safely , not so in the states . I go to Mexico quite often and never worry much for my bike and self but when I get back to the States and am traveling back to CO I spend half the night peering out the window to my bikes !!!
I have spent time in Chile ,Peru and Bolivia and have never had a problem at all . Folks are very friendly to dumb ass gringos , just make the attempt to speak Spanish and they will look after you , don't be an ignorant know it all tourist !
Ain't no one taking a Royal Enfield Himalayan in the states. LOL! My bikes have spent more nights in hotel parking lots than I can remember and never an issue. Mostly Kawasakis with Triumph and Harley thrown in there.
 

TN_twowheeladdict

Well travelled
Location
Tennessee
Hmm I know of two fellas that had bikes taken off trailers in CO .
What kind of bikes?

On trailers usually means that they didn't have the steering locked or the disk locked or cable locked to anything. Easy targets.

Mine are always covered with cheap walmart dark covers so they aren't noticeable from a distance and many hotels let me park the bikes under the front awning. I've spent many nights in El Paso for work on various bikes. I always told people that I would get more from the insurance company than I could realistically sell the bikes for and I would just fly home or buy another bike there if I found a deal on one I wanted.
 

Shearboy

Finally made it
Location
USA CO
One was an 650 Dakar taken in CO Springs and the other I can't remember right now , the Dakar was covered and had a lock . Sometimes folks like this don't care what they are stealing just the act of stealing gets them off ! I spend months on the road and like you use a cover but I have to say I'm much more comfortable when the bike is beside my tent than outside a motel room .
 
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