New Himalayan Fit Up

pompadom

Getting there...
Location
West Sussex UK
I have fitted the above fuse box to my Himmi. The clear cover sits quite high, restricting where it can be fitted. Fitting it to where the Document cover is a no-no as it fails the front seat. The only place i found it fits is by the rear seat locking mechanism above the document cover and even that's a bit tight again due to the hight.
 

super8rider

Getting there...
Location
Lil Rhody
Certainly, you can power directly from the battery if you wish, but it is highly recommended to have an inline fuse on the positive wire as close to the battery terminal as possible. If you intend installing several items this way...lights, GPS, heated grips, USB outlet etc, the battery terminals and associated area will soon become a confusing rats nest of wires and fuses. Just like having a Christmas tree of double adaptors connected to a power outlet in your house.

The PDM60 is a far more elegant solution.....requiring only one connection to the battery terminals. If wired properly and each circuit identified correctly, it becomes far easier to diagnose faults on your Auxillary circuits. The circuit breaker ratings are adjustable and if tripped will alert you visually to the faulty circuit, they will also automatically reset when the fault is cleared.

There are alternative (cheaper) methods of achieving this besides the PDM60 and the like....Just search fuse blocks on ebay
Ok, I see the utility of the PDM60, but since its install currently is intimidating, I will tackle that GPS support bar and also the TPMS which is a great safety enhancer. (I'd like to eventually install a USB power socket as well as additional fwd facing lights.) Regarding pairing the TPMS with the Garmin GPS, are there any caveats/gotchas? For instance, is any TPMS compatible?

As long as there's a decent quality video on line, I'd feel confident in my ability to perform the install.

Thanks for posting your prog reports.
 

super8rider

Getting there...
Location
Lil Rhody
What model Garmin GPS do you have..?
None. I've been trying to decide between the 595 and 396. Presently favoring the 595 since it comes w/ a host of accessories as well as lifetime map updates. I've since learned that the tire pressure monitors (Zumo accessory) require metal valve stems to function, and are ez picking for a thief since they don't pair specifically to the GPS. (It seems to me that could be something Garmin could address with a software/firmware fix.)
 

TN_twowheeladdict

Well travelled
Location
Tennessee
Ok, I see the utility of the PDM60, but since its install currently is intimidating, I will tackle that GPS support bar and also the TPMS which is a great safety enhancer. (I'd like to eventually install a USB power socket as well as additional fwd facing lights.) Regarding pairing the TPMS with the Garmin GPS, are there any caveats/gotchas? For instance, is any TPMS compatible?

As long as there's a decent quality video on line, I'd feel confident in my ability to perform the install.

Thanks for posting your prog reports.
I'm not sure how much value added TPMS is for tube tires. Every flat I have gotten with a tube tire as been a rapid deflation but the tube tears and there is not a good bead seal. I definitely see the advantage on tubeless tires because a puncture tends to take a minute or more to deflate giving you time to pull over if you have a flashing display somewhere in your view. TPMS has saved me from ruining a rim or wrecking a couple times.
 

Sherpa

Well travelled
None. I've been trying to decide between the 595 and 396. Presently favoring the 595 since it comes w/ a host of accessories as well as lifetime map updates. I've since learned that the tire pressure monitors (Zumo accessory) require metal valve stems to function, and are ez picking for a thief since they don't pair specifically to the GPS. (It seems to me that could be something Garmin could address with a software/firmware fix.)
The Zumo 595 would be my choice. I had Garmin TPMS monitors fitted to my previous bike for at least 5 years without any concern for their security. (But then again I do tend to ride in more remote country areas and only very rarely in cities etc).
 

Sherpa

Well travelled
I'm not sure how much value added TPMS is for tube tires. Every flat I have gotten with a tube tire as been a rapid deflation but the tube tears and there is not a good bead seal. I definitely see the advantage on tubeless tires because a puncture tends to take a minute or more to deflate giving you time to pull over if you have a flashing display somewhere in your view. TPMS has saved me from ruining a rim or wrecking a couple times.
A rapid deflation at 110Kph resulting in my bike jumping into the oncoming traffic lane was the initial reason for me going for a TPMS....(Never wanted to experience that again..!!)

Since fitting the TPMS, I have been alerted me on at least 3 occasions that I had a leak, giving me time to reduce speed, preventing damage to the tyre and rim and also find a suitable/safe location to effect repairs.
 
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super8rider

Getting there...
Location
Lil Rhody
A rapid deflation at 110Kph resulting in my bike jumping into the oncoming traffic lane was the initial reason for me going for a TPMS....(Never wanted to experience that again..!!)
Since fitting the TPMS, I have been alerted me on at least 3 occasions that I had a leak, giving me time to reduce speed, preventing damage to the tyre and rim and also find a suitable/safe location to effect repairs.
Yeah, I see the value of monitoring pressures even if not that useful in a (rapid deflation) tube/tire combination. It's unlikely I'm gonna verify correct tire pressure prior to every ride, hence I like it for that reason.
How do you account for that many leaks Sherpa? Three leaks seems better suited to a life time of riding.
 

pompadom

Getting there...
Location
West Sussex UK
Every puncture ive had with tubed tyres is they went flat within half a minute. Well, it seemed that fast. Comparing it when ive been able to travel a while with a tubeless tyre. So in my case with tubed tyres ive had very little time to react to a puncture at high speed let alone time looking at a flashing light. TPMS on the tubeless tyre but little use with a tubed tyre.
 

TN_twowheeladdict

Well travelled
Location
Tennessee
Since fitting the TPMS, I have been alerted me on at least 3 occasions that I had a leak, giving me time to reduce speed, preventing damage to the tyre and rim and also find a suitable/safe location to effect repairs.
On the Himalayan? What was the source of the leaks and were you using a tire sealant in the tubes.
 

blender

Finally made it
Location
Wisconsin
None. I've been trying to decide between the 595 and 396. Presently favoring the 595 since it comes w/ a host of accessories as well as lifetime map updates.
The 396 is also lifetime maps. I'm not sure the extra parts that come with the 595 are worth it (I have a 590, previous generation). I don't use the 590 in the car. The slightly larger screen on the 590 is nice vs. the 396. You might also want to consider the Zumo XT.
 

Sherpa

Well travelled
How do you account for that many leaks Sherpa? Three leaks seems better suited to a life time of riding.
The leaks were accumulated over a period of 5 years and 65,000k's. Three were on the rear wheel and one on the front.

The front deflation which caused my bike to jump lanes was brought about after hitting a large rock at speed. This damaged the rim and pinched the tyre. I had stopped and checked the rim and tyre pressure only minutes before it decided to deflate and fall off the bead. By the time I managed to get the bike back under control and stopped, the tyre was smoking and my underwear required changing.......:oops:

Two of the rear punctures were on Mitas EO9 & EO7 tyres that were starting to show signs of wear....both punctures were caused by nails. I counted at least 8 nails in one tyre, so suspect they were deliberately placed on the road.!!!!!!:mad:

The last was due to operator error. I had done a quick tyre change prior to a ride and pinched the tube when mounting the tyre.....put around 3000k on it before it started deflating. Tyre was a Motoz Desert, bike was my XT660Z Tenere...recently traded for a Himalayan.

I always carry spare front and rear tubes and tube patches due to the remote areas in which I ride.

Another advantage of TPMS is the ability to monitor tyre pressure on the fly....It is amazing how quickly tyre pressures change when you are "working" them. I normally set my tyre pressure to around 22 PSI front and rear prior to riding (I ride at least 75% dirt 25% tar). On tar, the pressure quickly climbs to around 30 PSI front and rear. On dirt, pressures settle around 26-28 psi.

P1040233 (Large).jpeg
 
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Sherpa

Well travelled
The 396 is also lifetime maps. I'm not sure the extra parts that come with the 595 are worth it (I have a 590, previous generation). I don't use the 590 in the car. The slightly larger screen on the 590 is nice vs. the 396. You might also want to consider the Zumo XT.
Check with Garmin...I do not think the 396 or the new XT are compatible with the current Garmin "ant" tyre pressure senders. I will be updating my Zumo 390LM to a 595LM soon so that I can continue using my existing senders. The new ZUMO XT will eventually replace the 595LM, so I am expecting 595 prices will soon drop.
 
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Sherpa

Well travelled
I have a zumo 396.
Pretty the tyre pressure sensors do not work with the 396.
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Annoying when manufacturers do not make new developments backwards compatible with current accessories. The Zumo XT supposedly supports "ant" but according to Johnny Appleseed, it is not compatible with existing ant sensors....:mad:
 
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cwadej

Well travelled
Location
San Diego
A rapid deflation at 110Kph resulting in my bike jumping into the oncoming traffic lane was the initial reason for me going for a TPMS....(Never wanted to experience that again..!!)

Since fitting the TPMS, I have been alerted me on at least 3 occasions that I had a leak, giving me time to reduce speed, preventing damage to the tyre and rim and also find a suitable/safe location to effect repairs.
How would TPMS have helped in case of "A rapid deflation at 110Kph ...."?
 

Sherpa

Well travelled
How would TPMS have helped in case of "A rapid deflation at 110Kph ...."?
Probably not at all :rolleyes:....I had just spent around 2 hours on dirt and finally had a 10K transport on tar.... grouped up for a drink and a break with my mates prior to pushing on...before which I visually checked both tyres, as I knew there had been some quite heavy hits on the dirt section. The first 10 minutes on tar was tight twisties before opening up on to a long straight where I accelerated up to 110 and stood to give my legs and butt a break. Fortunately, it was a country road with no traffic, as the bike jumped at least 3 meters to the opposite side of the road as the tyre broke away from the bead and it then went into a tank slapper as I backed off on the throttle....luckily I didn't go for the brakes as I'm sure it would not have ended well.

I was lucky enough to stop adjacent to a river crossing with a concrete bridge that was perfect for supporting the bike while changing out the tube.

The tube had a "pinch" flat which may or may not have deflated slowly enough to have registered on a TPMS . None the less I ordered one the moment I got home. Will not ride without one now.

20121221091.jpeg
 
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