Himalayan rear tyre hugger

Sleety

Getting there...
Location
United Kingdom
Hi all
Just wondered which rear tyre hugger you guys have experience of on the Himalayan.
Want to protect rear shock absorber and not sure which huggers have a blade which extends below the swinging arm to protect the linkage as well. The pyramid plastics one seems the most common here in the UK, but the Powerbronze also has a followimg. Not sure if the powerbronze has such an extension of proivdes better protection.
Any other ideas folks, seems £100+ is a lot for a piece of plastic so any thoughts on DIY options.
Many thanks
 

Robert

Well travelled
Location
Holland
The Hitchcocks thing looks nice but as you say, a hundred quid is a tad on the steep side...
I made a cover of some piece of waterproof material that was left over from my seat heightener. It is a simple rectangular piece of material about 25 by 35 cm (10 by 12 inches ME) sewn together at the long side. On top I made sewed it double for aboot half an inch through which I guided a shoe lace. Couple a weeks ago I took the suspension apart to grease the bearings of the swingarm and associated bits and then the shocker was accessible. Shoved the cover over, drew the string and Bob is your uncle. On the lower side it is open and reaches to about the lower end of the shocker, so it won't hold any water. It does cover the shocker from the water and sand that is thrown at it by the rear wheel.
Attached is a picture of the cover before assembly: it's the bit left of the chain. I'll take a picture of the thing in place when the weather gets better.
 

Attachments

Sleety

Getting there...
Location
United Kingdom
Hi
Thanks
The R&G shock tube does a similar thing, so I will probably dp that, but I also wamted a buard to protect the whole back end around the shock, not just the shock. Any other ideas welcome.
Cheers
 

Wintrup

Well travelled
Location
Cumbria UK
I cut a section of a mountain bike tyre into a flap and screwed it onto the existing plastic guard. It pretty much covers the shock, but the roads around here are so frequently salted and covered in dirt from agriculture, that when puddles form it still gets badly hit. As much as the REH is just right for riding locally, what lets it down are the poor quality of parts. It's already corroding badly in many places. This isn't specific to Royal Enfield, Jap bike also corrode quickly these days.
 

byteofthecherry

Getting there...
Location
west somerset
I cut a section of a mountain bike tyre into a flap and screwed it onto the existing plastic guard. It pretty much covers the shock, but the roads around here are so frequently salted and covered in dirt from agriculture, that when puddles form it still gets badly hit. As much as the REH is just right for riding locally, what lets it down are the poor quality of parts. It's already corroding badly in many places. This isn't specific to Royal Enfield, Jap bike also corrode quickly these days.
I always did the extra flap thing...but the one for me is heavy setting high temp grease(it's specialist..I got mine from a steel fabrictors that made stuff for oil rigs) strip back wheel/shocks etc(everything you can)..use the best spatula for precise work(the human forefinger) and do the back of the crankcase/under the swingarm/shocker..ect..ect. th stuff sets like a very hard wax. the important thing when cleaning the bike don't powerwash those areas..get a normal hose and use a gentle spray to get caked mud off..don't brush..I've had this on some of my bikes for 20yrs..on the odd occasion I had to remove the protected area it has been like new. Another thing I'm OCD about is fasteners/bolts..usually assembled dry in the factory without washers....go round all the bike...unscrew everything(obviously not all at the same time)..generous application of a general purpose grease to threads..apply a washer(pref spring) and fasten back up...withe the internet it give access to screw suppliers that will send you anything overnight...this sort of world is ...beyond my imaginenation even 30 yrs ago..all the best..ride safe
 

Roy Gavin

Well travelled
We have to pay another 100 quid for postage to Oz, which makes it even less appealing, And no road salt here----!
TEC show their shock protector on their vid for anyone who doesnt know how the cut down inner tube works.
I do all the fasteners too, replacing then where possible with stainless.
Getting expansive now as the days of the cheap bucket of 700 pieces for 20 quid seem to have vanished, it was 5 quid for two 8 x 100 mm bolts last time!
 
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byteofthecherry

Getting there...
Location
west somerset
We have to pay another 100 quid for postage to Oz, which makes it even less appealing, And no road salt here----!
TEC show their shock protector on their vid for anyone who doesnt know how the cut down inner tube works.
I do all the fasteners too, replacing then where possible with stainless.
Getting expansive now as the days of the cheap bucker of 700 pieces for 20 quid seem to have vanished, it was 5 quid for 2 last time!
Yeah..agree about prices..even in the UK...however I notice Oz is really expensive...i'm still working off buckets bought 20 yrs ago...but getting low on the metric..still got a lot of AF...and Whitworth which now is almost impossible to get in stainless and when you can it's seriously expensive which 30 yrs ago was the case with metric.
 
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